Honda Cb750 Motorcycles for sale in Indianapolis, Indiana

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1991 Honda CB 750 NIGHTHAWK

$3,200

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year 1991

Make Honda

Model CB 750 NIGHTHAWK

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

ONLY 23,345 miles on one of the most versatile motorcycles manufactured. All black everything resembles Knight Rider's better half. I love this bike but need money for another:)All stock parts except:-New tires, front & back brakes, fork seals & dust covers, neck bearings, grips & Go Cruise, mirrors (aftermarket), clutch (steel's, friction and springs) and valve cover gasket-Carbs jetted & cleaned by Bloomington Powersports-Quick detach windshield-Custom paint by a member of Andretti Autosports crew with wheels, lower forks, brakes, and motor also received custom black treatment.Phenomenal starter bike for the new rider or an absolute must for collector's. Runs impeccably! Contact me quick - this won't stay up long...Asking $3,200 obo contact me at 317-457-8910

1991 Honda Cb 750

$6,999

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year 2016

Make Kawasaki

Model VULCAN

Category Cruiser Motorcycles

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

2016 KAWASAKI VULCAN,

Honda : CB 1973 Honda CB750 Motorcycle

$1,500

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Build date of 8/72 sold as a 1973. A co-worker friend gave me this bike back in 93 because of his bad health. Some new stuff was added to get it road worthy, listed below. I only put about 30 miles on it after that work then stored it in my home garage under a tarp. The bike has not been started for 8 years. Unfortunately I failed to drain the gas which has turned to varnish. The tank has rust inside top 20% but bottom 80% looks rust free, could not get a picture of that. The odometer shows 22,749 miles but the Title says 27,880. I just noticed that difference and not sure why or how that happened. My friend is dead now so can’t ask him. Most of the chrome has surface rust. It has not rusted through the pipes. The seat is wrinkled looking in the pic because a box had sat on it for years. It will probably smooth out after some time in the sun. The carbs move freely. Bike rolls easily and does not leak oil. Needs new battery. Electric starter worked when the battery was good. The engine kicks over freely and has compression. Front brake hydraulic line needs to be replaced. Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lv8tMV_71ZE&list=UUk5FJGBgaU3AWXx_tSbahzw&index=2 VIN # CB750- 2061362 Engine # CB750E-2069113 Frame # CB750-2061362 Known Good Clean title 4 shop refurbished Carburetors New Electronic ignition, plugs and wires New brake pads and shoes New Clutch New Chain New Tires New Headlight New Tail light and turn signals New air filter New oil filter New fork seals and boots Garaged storage Complete tool kit with pouch Known Bad Needs new battery Odometer different than Title Widespread Surface Rust Not ran in 8 years Some gas tank internal rust Smoking a little last run Not original paint Needs Front brake hydraulic line This needs to be picked up at my house as I cannot crate or ship. Buyer is responsible for all shipping fees and arrangements. I live on a large street that is semi truck accessible. This item is sold "AS IS" where is. Not offering warranties or refunds. A $300 non-refundable deposit is required within 72 hours after listing end, full balance due within 7 days of listing end. Please feel free to contact me by email with any questions or concerns. Item is as described to the best of my knowledge. Please ask any questions prior to bidding/buying. No refunds will be offered! If buyer requirements are not complied with I reserve the right to re-list the item. Thank you.

1993 Honda CB 750 NIGHTHAWK

$9,499

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year 2015

Make Yamaha

Model V-STAR 1300 DELUXE

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

2015 YAMAHA V-STAR 1300 DELUXE,

1993 Honda CB 750 NIGHTHAWK

Request Price

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year 2017

Make BMW

Model R Ninet Scrambler ABS

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

2017 BMW R Ninet Scrambler ABS, 2017 BMW R Ninet Scrambler ABS Honest. Untamed. Air-cooled. Feel the wind, lean into every curve and experience the freedom in every mile you ride the BMW R nineT Scrambler empowers you to do your own thing. Tough, unconventional, and against established standards. Made for true characters who want their bike to be pure and minimalistic. See, hear, feel. The unique sound of the R nineT Scrambler is a real attention grabber. The classic 1200 cc boxer engine and its high-positioned dual silencer give the bike a powerful voice. Compared to the R nineT, the handlebars are placed higher and the comfortable seat is repositioned. This ensures a confident and relaxed seating position for every rider. In combination with the slightly longer spring travel, you'll overcome rough spots with ease. No limits. Dual sport tires, a high exhaust system, and a relaxed, upright riding position help the Scrambler keep riding where the pavement ends. The 19-inch front wheel, the analog tachometer, a purist steel tank in monolith metallic matte and other unique details turn the Scrambler into a high-quality classic. And with just a few steps you can give the R nineT Scrambler your own individual touch. Pure Scrambler. Pure BMW Motorrad. The R nineT Scrambler is at the highest level in matters of safety, reliability and quality. Standard ABS and optional ASC provide extra safety.

2003 Honda CB750 Nighthawk

$3,499

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

2003 HONDA CB750 Nighthawk,

2003 Honda CB750 Nighthawk

$3,499

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

2003 HONDA CB750 Nighthawk,

1997 Honda CB750 Nighthawk, 5381 miles, perfect condition

$2,595

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

1997 Honda CB750 Nighthawk in black. This bike is absolutely mint. You must see this bike to appreciate the pristine condition. It has new tires and battery, front disc brake and 5 speed trans. This bike also has a Battery Tender lead wired in. A steal for $2595. Call Rick, Jim or John Cycle Werks in Barrington 847-381-8050

Honda : Other Honda VF1000R 1986 w/11K STREET LEGAL RACE BIKE 1000 CC RUNS GREAT NO RESERVE!!!

$2,795

Indianapolis, Indiana

Year -

Make -

Model -

Category -

Engine -

Posted Over 1 Month

This bike has only 11thousand miles. It is a 1986 VF1000R, honda built this bike just to win a race. It is a mechanical wonder. This bike runs and rides amazingly. The ONLY issue with this bike is cosmetics. The previous owner didn't like the HRC red/white/blue color scheme, so he rattlecanned over the stock. No cracked hoses, new tires, new brakes, and all the hard to find parts. Side covers that say "GEAR DRIVEN CAMS", uncracked rear cowl, rear seat cover, tool kit, original exhaust and mufflers (very hard to find), original turn signals, HID headlamp bulbs, fuse box cover, uncracked and in tact full fairing. HERE'S SOME INFO IF YOU'RE NOT FAMILIAR WITH THIS BIKE: Patterned after the FWS "Works Bike" that Steve Wise, Mike Baldwin and Freddie Spencer used to shred rear tires with regularity, this was Honda's effort to homologate an endurance racer. Full fairing (in fiberglass not plastic) with a single headlight lens and small vents on either side and two cute round tail lights out back, 16" front wheel & 17" rear wheel were of the NS/NSR style "Comstar" bolt together wheels, not cast (hub an rim where connected via bolted on struts), endurance racer spec. quick release forks, with the obligatory TRAC mechanical anti-dive mechanisms. Single rear shock w/ 2 sided Alloy swingarm, Gear driven cams, 4/2 exhaust. Color was typical Honda HRC color. Honda's enthusiasm for the V4 engine I layout in the early 1980s was such that by 1984 the VF range comprised six models with capacities ranging from 400 to 1000cc. The fastest and most glamorous was the VF1000R: a limited-edition super-sports machine that was created, with little expense spared, to dominate production racing in the way that the straight-four CB1100R had done three years earlier. With its full fairing and racy red. white and blue paintwork, the VF1000R looked every bit the street-legal competition machine. Its specification list was mouth-watering, based on a liquid-cooled, 90-degree V4 engine that incorporated gear-driven overhead camshafts and produced no less than 122 hp @ l0000 rpm. That peak power output was 6bhp up on that of the VF1000F, the standard 998cc, 16-valve V4 from which the R model was derived. The I000F, also released in 1984. was an impressively fast and sophisticated bike. Its styling was similar to that of the original VF750F sportster, which had promised much before suffering widely publicized engine reliability problems. The VF1000F handled well and its engine was flexible, powerful and reliable. The exotic VF1000R cost roughly 50 per cent more than the F. and oozed quality from every pore. Its fairing was reinforced with carbon-fibre, its adjustable handlebars were made from polished alloy, its streamlined seat hump fitted perfectly. Its engine's gear-driven cams allowed more precise valve timing at high revs, which accounted for some of the extra power. In March 1984, Honda introduced the VF1000R in Europe. Its styling was a celebration of the V4's racing heritage and the VF1000R was a showcase for the technology Honda had developed on the track with the FWS1000 race bike which was designed for competition in the Daytona 200 and AMA F1 class. The original concept Honda had in designing the VF1000R was that it would showcase and, more importantly, homologate all of the innovative and groundbreaking technology that had been used in the F1 class, for use in the production based classes of the time. This was not to be the case, though, as the finished bike weighed in at nearly 600 pounds with half a tank of fuel, roughly 85 pounds heavier than the VF1000F model, and for this reason was rarely used in competition, and struggled to be competitive when it was used. Many modifications were made to the VF1000F in its transformation into the "R" version including major engine reworking, major front suspension revision, bodywork revision, and rider ergonomics. The engine of the VF1000R was the same cast block as in the VF1000F, displacing the same 998 cc's as the standard model, but modifications were required to mount the gear train in each head, used for driving the cams. The crankshaft was also altered, in order to accept a straight-cut gear which would drive the gear train instead of the chain system, used in the "F" model. Each head had 2 gears held by a carrier, which was then bolted into the respective head, driving each of the two camshafts arranged in a dual overhead camshaft arrangement for each head. Total, there were 9 gears required to transmit power from the crankshaft to all 4 camshafts. The camshafts were altered in relation to the ones found on the "F" model in order to provide more power. This arrangement added 7 pounds to the weight of the engine when compared to the chain driven arrangement present in the "F" model. Gear noise is one of the major drawbacks of using a geartrain to drive cams. In order to thwart this, Honda used a rubber mounted double tooth system (essentially 2 gears slightly offset) on the gear mounted on each camshaft, as well as the lowest mounted gear in each head (driven by the crankshaft), offsetting the teeth by roughly half of the pitch. This allowed the lash to be entirely taken up by the tension of the two teeth resting on the gear below, hence eliminating some of the noise and lash inherent in this type of system. The motor still makes a whirring noise which can be heard, as this is an intrinsic property of the straight cut type of gears which were used. The gear driven cams went on to be a key feature Honda used in their line of VFR750 motorcycles throughout the remainder of the 80's and throughout the 90's. The heads of the engine were also redesigned relative to the "F" model, with a redesigned squish zone in the combustion chamber, aiding in eliminating detonation within the cylinder. The redesigned head raised compression to 11:1 (up from 10.5:1 on the standard model) and power to 122 hp (125 for the USA version), up from 113 hp on the "F" model. The coolant system was altered from that of the "F" model, via the utilization of different thermostat settings and through the use of 2 radiators. The lower of the two radiators had 2 fans which drew air through the radiator from the back side, while the upper relied on ram-air, drawn from vents around the headlight opening. The exhaust system was slightly altered, utilizing an exhaust collector box (directly downstream for each of the four header pipes) with slightly augmented output angles for each of the two exhaust pipes compared to the "F" model. This was done in an attempt to increase ground clearance while cornering. The rear suspension (air shock with adjustable damping control) and frame (square-section steel tube type) were direct carryovers from the "F" model, but the front suspension featured Honda's anti-dive system named "TRAC" which stood for "Torque Reactive Anti-dive Control". This system utilized the left brake hangar being pinned to the fork on the bottom mount and allowed to pivot in an anti-clockwise direction, thereby closing a valve in the left fork leg, forcing the damping fluid through a smaller passageway, and increasing the damping rate under hard braking. The left fork leg had a screw-type adjuster with four positions of adjustment which would change the amount of influence this system had under braking. The fork also featured a Schrader-type air valve which allowed air assistance from 0-6 psi to increase the spring rate in the fork. The right fork leg featured a 3 position hand adjustable dial which would increase damping rates. The fork also featured quick-release, swing-away axle clamps for faster tire changes in endurance racing. Many of these features were seen as very exotic for the time, and modern adjustable sportbike suspension can trace design roots to these features. The braking system was improved via the use of dual floating front discs and racing style piston calipers on the ventilated rear disc. This was the first time a ventilated disc brake had been used on a road going motorcycle Compared to the VF1000F, the VF1000R had completely different bodywork and rider positioning. The "R" model got fully faired, racer replica bodywork with rearset footpegs and adjustable clip-on handlebars. The handlebars were adjustable through a range of 4 degrees in 2 degree increments via a double serrated ring which meshed with the handle and the mounting ring parts of the clip on. Even with the adjustment available in the clip ons, period tests still criticized the bike for having too committed of a riding position, with a long stretch over the tank.[1] The gas tank had a 6.2 gallon capacity for the European models, and was redesigned, with a smaller 5.8 gallon capacity for the USA models. This was used with an eye on endurance racing, utilizing the larger tank for homologation in racing where the larger capacity would result in longer time between pit stops. The front fairing of the VF1000R was split into two pieces, including the upper half and the lower half of the fairing. These both attached to a metal bracket which ran around the perimeter of the engine. The lower fairing was held on primarily by the use of 6 quarter-turn, race type fasteners (3 per side) with the aid of 4 traditional bolts (2 per side). The bolts which held the lower fairing on at the connection to the upper fairing also went through holes in the upper fairing in order to ensure proper panel gaps and alignment. On models from 1985 and later, the lower fairing also featured spring-loaded vent doors which could be opened and closed in order to cool the engine and rider during high temperature conditions. The upper fairing of the VF1000R featured a sealed air intake behind the headlight, which directed air towards the upper mounted engine coolant radiator. Because of this, most VF1000R's used in competition had the front number plates mounted on the front of the windscreen instead of in the traditional location, where the headlight would be on the road going version. This area was filled with a mesh screen in order to feed the radiator with the maximum amount of air possible. Wheels were changed from the "F" model to utilize 16 inch front and 17 inch rear NS type bolt together aluminum ComStar wheels. These wheels were constructed of a 5 pointed design which used bolts to connect the aluminum "spokes" to the hub and rim. The 16 inch front wheel was used to aid steering response, and the 17 inch rear saw the first use of radial construction tire for the European models. The American market models were sold with the traditional bias ply construction tire. In order to complete the endurance racer appearance of the bike, a removable solo seat cowl was included as were dual round endurance racer headlights and taillights. The dual headlight was changed to a single square light with white and black plastic surround on the initial US release models in order to satisfy what most major manufacturers thought would be a requirement of USA street legal vehicles in the near future. The legislation never passed and Honda included the very desirable dual round headlight on the 1986 USA models